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posted 4 days ago via pugdomination

questionlife:

Proposed track listings for Bruce Springsteen’s “Album #3”

The lyrics sheet added of Glory Road at the end indicates that the song most likely developed into Born to Run, and not to Thunder Road as previously suggested: the line “I looked out over (cross) my hood + (saw) the highway buckle in the heat” was later used in an early draft of Born to Run and much of the last verse later became the last few lines of the very same same song.

However, we find that Glory Road and Born to Run are not the same thing, as evidenced in the above-mentioned (1st pic) proposed handwritten song list for Springsteen’s third album, where they are listed as track 5 and 8, respectively. 

The “Born To Run - Glory Road” on the second picture apparently means that he was undecided which song to include as the fourth track. This also may suggest that the (presumably) early draft of Glory Road later evolved into two very different songs: Glory Road (whose lyrics are yet to surface) and Born to Run.

/personal note: I get so fucking angry when I think about all the songs this guy is probably sitting on and refuses to release because they’re not “good enough”. Make something equivalent to a “Tracks #2” album already, you absolute doofus. 

(Source: springsteenlyrics.com)

posted 4 days ago via show-a-little-faith

(Source: twitter.com)

brightwalldarkroom:

“School of Rock is beautiful in many ways because it plays out like a fantasy film. Of course it’s not realistic. Of course that’s not how educators should behave. It’s not real, but you want it to be real. I watched School of Rock in my early teens and wanted to be part of it. I wanted music to be as magical for me as it was to the kids in the film. I wanted it to save my life, but instead it became my life. I became a percussion score on a piece of paper.
That’s the thing about rock ‘n roll, Dewey explains. You don’t win at it. You can do a thing called Battle of the Bands and you can win a big check, but you’re never really winning at music. It’s not a competition. It’s about how it makes you feel. For the kids in School of Rock, music is liberating. It opens up a snooty, private school education into something bigger and better that allows the students to express themselves. You learn how to create and build something that is both yours and not yours. Music is about sharing. It’s about giving something away to someone else.”
—Fran Hoepfner on School of Rock
(Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #16, September 2014)

brightwalldarkroom:

School of Rock is beautiful in many ways because it plays out like a fantasy film. Of course it’s not realistic. Of course that’s not how educators should behave. It’s not real, but you want it to be real. I watched School of Rock in my early teens and wanted to be part of it. I wanted music to be as magical for me as it was to the kids in the film. I wanted it to save my life, but instead it became my life. I became a percussion score on a piece of paper.

That’s the thing about rock ‘n roll, Dewey explains. You don’t win at it. You can do a thing called Battle of the Bands and you can win a big check, but you’re never really winning at music. It’s not a competition. It’s about how it makes you feel. For the kids in School of Rock, music is liberating. It opens up a snooty, private school education into something bigger and better that allows the students to express themselves. You learn how to create and build something that is both yours and not yours. Music is about sharing. It’s about giving something away to someone else.”

—Fran Hoepfner on School of Rock

(Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #16, September 2014)

posted 5 days ago via brightwalldarkroom